At Home Women’s Health + Fertility Test

Health & fertility screening for women

  • Mail-in kit for home use
  • Test in just 5 minutes
  • Lab results in 2-5 days
  • 100% pain free
  • Free 2-Day shipping

Temporarily unavailable in NY state.

Collection Methods:
  • Finger prick
  • Saliva sample

$299.00

At Home Women’s Health + Fertility Test

Fast, easy, and affordable at-home testing

PRIVATE

Test from the
privacy of home

EASY

Lab Certified
5 minute test

FAST

Get results
in 2 - 5 days

FREE

Physician
Consultations

What is an At Home Women’s Health and Fertility Test?

The myLAB Box at home womens health and fertility test kit measures a comprehensive panel of 10 key hormones that affect women’s overall health.  This test will determine if your hormones are balanced or if you may have hormone imbalances that could be contributing to symptoms that don’t have you feeling your best.

Included: 1 Women’s Health and a pre-addressed return envelope (Postage Paid)

What do I need to do to prepare for the At Home Women’s Health and Fertility Test?

It is recommended you not do any vigorous exercising the day before the test. It is also recommended you temporarily stop taking medicines that can affect the test, including: Anti-seizure drugs, Estrogen, Human-made (synthetic) glucocorticoids, such as hydrocortisone, prednisone and prednisolone, and Androgens.

Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. Do not stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first.

What do the Results Of My At Home Women’s Health and Fertility Test Mean?

Your test results will provide you with a comprehensive view of your current hormone levels.

 

Older women are more likely than men to have chronic, or ongoing, health conditions

What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test and What do the Results Mean?

  • The test is done to check for increased or decreased cortisol production. 

    Cortisol is a glucocorticoid (steroid) hormone released from the adrenal gland in response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). 

    ACTH is a hormone released from the pituitary gland in the brain. It plays a role in: bone growth, blood pressure control, immune system function, metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and protein, nervous system function, and stress response.

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    Perform the test at various time-points within the day (morning, noon, evening, night). This is important, because cortisol level varies throughout the day.

    It is recommended you not do any vigorous exercising the day before the test.

    It is also recommended you temporarily stop taking medicines that can affect the test, including: Anti-seizure drugs, Estrogen, Human-made (synthetic) glucocorticoids, such as hydrocortisone, prednisone and prednisolone, and Androgens.

    Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test.

    DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first.

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Saliva):

    Pre- and Post-menopausal:

    • Morning = 1.5 – 9.6 ng/ml
    • Noon = 0.6 – 4.1 ng/ml
    • Evening = 0.2 – 2.3 ng/ml
    • Night = 0.1 – 1.8 ng/ml

    A higher than normal level may indicate: Cushing’s Disease in which the pituitary gland makes too much ACTH because of excess growth of the pituitary gland or a tumor in the pituitary gland, Ectopic Cushing syndrome, in which a tumor outside the pituitary or adrenal glands makes too much ACTH, and a Tumor of the adrenal gland that is producing too much cortisol

    A lower than normal level may indicate: Addison’s disease, in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough cortisol, Hypopituitarism in which the pituitary gland does not signal the adrenal gland to produce enough cortisol, and suppression of normal pituitary or adrenal function by glucocorticoid medicines including pills, skin creams, eye drops, inhalers, joint injections, and chemotherapy

  • One of the most abundant hormones in the body, and a precursor to estrogen and testosterone; also balances some of the negative effects of high cortisol. 

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    Stress can raise your levels, so you may need to rest before your test.

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Saliva): 34 – 496 pg/mL

    An increase in DHEA-sulfate may be due to a common genetic disorder called congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a tumor of the adrenal gland (benign or malignant), a common problem in women younger than 50, called polycystic ovary syndrome, or body changes of a girl in puberty happening earlier than normal.

    A decrease in DHEA sulfate may be due to adrenal gland disorders that produce lower than normal amounts of adrenal hormones, including adrenal insufficiency and Addison’s disease, the pituitary gland not producing normal amounts of its hormones (hypopituitarism), and taking glucocorticoid medicines.

  • How well your ovaries, placenta, or adrenal glands work:

    • If you have signs of an ovarian tumor
    • If female body characteristics are not developing normally
    • If your periods have stopped
    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    Your health care provider may tell you to temporarily stop taking certain medicines that may affect test results. 

    These include: 

    • Birth control pills
    • Antibiotics such as ampicillin or tetracycline
    • Corticosteroids
    • DHEA
    • Estrogen
    • Medicine to manage mental disorders (such as phenothiazine), and Testosterone

    DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first.

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Saliva):

    • Pre-menopausal (Luteal) = 1.1 – 7.8 pg/mL
    • Pre-menopausal (Follicular) = 0.8 – 6.5 pg/mL
    • Post-menopausal = 0.3 – 4.3 pg/mL
    • Estrogen Replacement = 1.2 – 17.8 pg/mL
    • Synthetic HRT/Contraceptives = 0.3 – 4.3 pg/mL

    Abnormal Results:

    • Early (precocious puberty) in girls, Growth of abnormally large breasts in men (gynecomastia), Lack of periods in women (amenorrhea), Reduced function of the ovaries, Problem with genes, such as Klinefelter syndrome, Turner’s syndrome
  • FSH is a hormone released by the pituitary gland.

    FSH helps manage the menstrual cycle and stimulates the ovaries to produce eggs. 

    The test is used to help evaluate: Menopause, women who have Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), ovarian cysts, and abnormal vaginal or menstrual bleeding.

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    Your health care provider may tell you to temporarily stop taking certain medicines that may affect test results. 

    These include: Birth control pills, Antibiotics such as ampicillin or tetracycline, Corticosteroids, DHEA, Estrogen, Medicine to manage mental disorders (such as phenothiazine), and Testosterone

    DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first.

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Blood Spot):

    • Pre-menopausal(Luteal & Follicular) = 2-10 mIU/mL
    • Pre-menopausal(mid-cycle) = 7 – 20 mIU/mL
    • Postmenopausal = 20 – 100 mIU/mL

    High FSH levels in women may be present: During or after menopause, When receiving hormone therapy, Due to certain types of tumor in the pituitary gland, and Due to Turner syndrome

    Low FSH levels in women may be present due to:  Being very underweight or having had recent rapid weight loss, Not producing eggs (not ovulating), Parts of the brain (the pituitary gland or hypothalamus) not producing normal amounts, and Pregnancy

  • LH is a hormone released by the pituitary gland, located on the underside of the brain. 

    In women, an increase in LH level at mid-cycle causes release of eggs (ovulation).

    The test evaluates if: you are ovulating or have reached menopause.

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    If you are a woman of childbearing age, the test may need to be done on a specific day of your menstrual cycle.

    Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test.

    DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first.

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Blood Spot):

    • Pre-menopausal(Luteal) = 0.5-12.8 mIU/mL
    • Pre-menopausal(Follicular) = 1.6 – 9.3 mIU/mL
    • Menopausal = 15.0 – 64.0 mIU/mL

    In women, a higher than normal level of LH is seen: When women of childbearing age are not ovulating, When there is an imbalance of female sex hormones (PCOS), During or after menopause, Turner syndrome, and When the ovaries produce little or no hormones (ovarian hypofunction). 

  • This measures the level of progesterone in the blood. Progesterone is a hormone made by a woman’s ovaries. Progesterone plays an important role in pregnancy. It helps make your uterus ready to support a fertilized egg. Progesterone also helps prepare your breasts for making milk.

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    You don’t need any special preparations for a progesterone test.

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Saliva):

    • Pre-menopausal (Luteal) = 99 – 333 pg/mL
    • Pre-menopausal (Follicular) = 9 – 126 pg/mL
    • Post-menopausal = 9 – 126 pg/mL
    • Topical, Troche, Vaginal(20-60mg) = 196 – 3304 pg/mL
    • Oral = 35 – 400 pg/mL
    • Synthetic HRT/Contraceptives = 9 – 75 pg/mL

    If your progesterone levels are higher than normal, it may mean you are pregnant, have a cyst on your ovaries, have a molar pregnancy (a growth in the abdomen that causes symptoms of pregnancy), have a disorder of the adrenal gland, or have ovarian cancer.

    Your progesterone levels may be even higher if you are pregnant with two or more babies.

    If your progesterone levels are lower than normal, it may mean you have an ectopic pregnancy, a miscarriage, or are not ovulating normally, which can cause fertility problems.

  • Both men and women produce this hormone. In females, the ovaries produce most of the testosterone. 

    Levels are most often checked to evaluate signs of higher testosterone levels. 

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test.

    DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first.

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Saliva): 10 – 61pg/mL

    Certain health conditions, medicines, or injury can lower testosterone. It also naturally drops with age. 

    Decreased total testosterone may be due to: Chronic illness, The pituitary gland does not produce normal amounts of its hormones, Problem with areas of the brain that control hormones, Low thyroid function, Benign tumor of the pituitary cells that produce too much of the hormone prolactin, and Too much body fat (obesity)

    Increased total testosterone level may be due to: Ovarian tumors, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and medications

  • Thyroid peroxidase (TPO), an enzyme normally found in the thyroid gland, and plays an important role in the production of thyroid hormones. A TPO test detects antibodies against TPO in the blood.

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test.

    DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first. 

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Blood Spot): <60 IU/mL

    The presence of TPO antibodies in your blood suggests that the cause of thyroid disease is an autoimmune disorder, such as Hashimoto’s disease or Graves’ disease. In autoimmune disorders, your immune system makes antibodies that mistakenly attack normal tissue. Antibodies that attack the thyroid gland cause inflammation and impaired function of the thyroid.

    Some people with TPO antibodies may not have thyroid disease. However, the presence of TPO antibodies may increase the risk of future thyroid disorders. If you have normal thyroid function with TPO antibodies, your doctor may recommend periodic checkups to watch for future thyroid problems.

  • TSH is produced by the pituitary gland. It prompts the thyroid gland to make and release thyroid hormones into the blood. 

    The test is used if there are symptoms or signs of an overactive or underactive thyroid gland. It is also used to monitor treatment of these conditions, and if there are plans for pregnancy.

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test.DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first.

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Blood Spot):

    • Pre- and Post-menopausal = 0.5 – 4.7 𝜇U/mL

    A higher-than-normal TSH level is most often due to an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). There are many causes of this problem.

    A lower-than-normal level may be due to an overactive thyroid gland, which can be caused by: Graves disease, Toxic nodular goiter, Too much iodine in the body (due to receiving iodine contrast used during imaging tests, such as CT scan), Taking too much thyroid hormone medicine or prescribed natural or over-the- counter supplements that contain thyroid hormone

    Use of certain medicines may also cause a lower-than- normal TSH level. 

  • T3 plays an important role in the body’s control of metabolism. 

    This test is done to check your thyroid function. Thyroid function depends on the action of T3 and other hormones, including thyroid- stimulating hormone (TSH) and T4.

    This test measures the T3 that is floating free in the blood.

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test.DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first.

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Blood Spot): 2.1 – 4.2 pg/ml

    A higher-than-normal level of T3 may be a sign of: Overactive thyroid gland (Graves disease),T3 thyrotoxicosis (rare), Toxic nodular goiter, Taking thyroid medicines or certain supplements (common), and Liver disease

    A high level of T3 may occur in pregnancy (especially with morning sickness at the end of the first trimester) or with the use of birth control pills or estrogen.

    A lower-than-normal level may be due to: Severe short-term or some long-term illnesses, Thyroiditis (swelling or inflammation of the thyroid gland – Hashimoto disease is the most common type), Starvation, and Underactive thyroid gland

  • T4 (thyroxine) is the main hormone produced by the thyroid gland. 

    This test measures the amount of free T4 in your blood. The tests are done if you have signs of a thyroid disorder, including: Abnormal findings of other thyroid blood tests, such as TSH or T3, Symptoms of an underactive thyroid, Hypopituitarism (the pituitary gland does not produce enough of its hormones), Lump or nodule in the thyroid, Enlarged or irregular thyroid gland, or Problems becoming pregnant.

    What do I Need to do to Prepare for the Test?

    Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test.

    DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first. 

    What do the Results Mean?

    Normal (Blood Spot):  0.8 – 2.0 ng/dL

    To fully understand results of the free T4 test, results of other thyroid blood tests, such as TSH or T3, may be needed.

    Test results may also be affected by pregnancy, estrogen level, liver problems, more severe body-wide illnesses, and inherited changes in a protein that binds T4.

    A higher than normal level of T4 may be due to conditions that involve an overactive thyroid, including: Graves disease, Taking too much thyroid hormone medicine, Thyroiditis, Toxic goiter or toxic thyroid nodules, Some tumors of the  ovaries (rare), Getting medical imaging tests with contrast dye that contains iodine (rare, and only if there is a problem with the thyroid), and Eating a lot of foods that contain iodine (very rare, and only if there is a problem with the thyroid)

    A lower than normal level of T4 may be due to: Hypothroidism (including Hashimoto disease and other disorders involving an underactive thyroid), Severe acute illness, Malnutrition or fasting, and Use of certain medicines. 

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Disclaimer

myLAB Box offers individuals with laboratory services for wellness monitoring. All tests are validated by myLAB Box clinical laboratory affiliates. Results are comparable to samples collected in a physician’s office or clinical laboratory. Tests used in myLAB Box kits have been developed and performance characteristics determined by myLAB Box clinical laboratory affiliates. Tests have not been approved by the US Federal and Drug Administration (FDA), although individual components of some tests performed in the laboratory are FDA-cleared. The FDA has determined that such clearance or approval is not necessary for laboratory-developed tests such as those offered by my LAB Box. These tests are used for clinical purposes only. They should not be regarded as investigational or for research. myLAB Box clinical laboratory affiliates are regulated under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) of 1988 as qualified to perform high complexity clinical testing and follow the guidelines of the College of American Pathologists (CAP). The tests, and services are not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure disease. All information given as to the use of the tests is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for a physician`s consultation.

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